Sunday, 14 July 2013

Mehndi Design India 2013 Pics Pictures Images Photos

Mehndi Design Indian Biography
source(google.com.pk)

Henna, also called mehndi and mehandi, is an all-natural, reddish brown body stain that
looks like a tattoo but isn’t. The paste made from the dried, ground leaves of the henna
shrub, Lawsonia Inermis and a liquid solution that varies from place to place and person
to person, has been in use as a cosmetic from ancient times. Some of the earliest records
that we have shows its use in Ancient Egypt where it was used to stain the hands, feet
nails and to colour and condition the hair. Traces of henna have even been found on the
nails of mummified Pharoahs. In the days of the Pharoahs the wearing of henna was a
mark of being of the higher classes, if you could take the time needed to apply and care
for your skin you obviously lived a life of luxury, over time that changed and every
woman be she of high or low birth, country or city born had henna applied to her skin,
many at least twice a year for special occasions.
In period Persia and Turkey had some of the most intricate and elegant henna patterning
in the Islamic world. Miniatures and pottery pieces from 900 to 1550 AD show elegantly
patterned dark henna. Some other cultures that used henna for body adornment are
Arabia, Crete, Egypt, Algeria, Yemen, Cyprus, Morocco, Spain, Thailand and Sicily.
The use of henna, it is believed; began when the nomadic peoples found that their body
temperatures came down when they applied it to their skin. They then tried a simple dot
and found that it too had the same effect and from there designs began, some simple and
geometric others like those of Persia, flowery and delicate, like fine lace. Each region
had their own methods and designs, all different and yet all beautiful. Other areas wanted
a darker stain so that would go over the design 3 and 4 times to assure a near black stain.
In the Sudan they used a technique called ‘dukhan’ meaning smoke, in which after the
design has been placed on the skin the area is then placed over a smoking fire that has
been set in a hole in the ground. When the paste is brushed away the stain appears black.
One question that is often asked is why did the art of henna remain part of the Middle
Eastern culture and never make its way to the Western world, like so many other aspects
of that world. We are not completely sure, perhaps it has to do with the needs of the
seeds to grow properly, or perhaps the dried powder lost its staining ability during the
transportation, due to light or moisture. Others think that perhaps Europeans may have
been given the leaves but not told what to do with them to create the paste. For some
reason this traditional art-form only traveled within the Eastern world.
Mehndi Design India 2013 Pics Pictures Images Photos
 Mehndi Design India 2013 Pics Pictures Images Photos
 Mehndi Design India 2013 Pics Pictures Images Photos
 Mehndi Design India 2013 Pics Pictures Images Photos
 Mehndi Design India 2013 Pics Pictures Images Photos
 Mehndi Design India 2013 Pics Pictures Images Photos
 Mehndi Design India 2013 Pics Pictures Images Photos
 Mehndi Design India 2013 Pics Pictures Images Photos
 Mehndi Design India 2013 Pics Pictures Images Photos

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